Jack and Jill Windmills Society - Registered Charity No:1118285

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IL 1831



















Home
The History of Clayton Windmills
Open Days and Mid-Week visits
Current and Archive Photographs
Jill Windmill News
Events
Links to Windmills in Sussex and further afield
Details of Society Membership and activities
Contact Us
Website Design : Simon Potter & Kevin Crampton
Website Design : Simon Potter & Kevin Crampton

Society volunteers have carried out the vast majority of the restoration of Jill Windmill


Some of the timbers used in the restoration of Jill Windmill were long and heavy
Some of the timbers used in the restoration of Jill Windmill were long and heavy


With enough volunteers, the carrying of a 5½ cwt. Sweep is not a problem
With enough volunteers, the carrying of a 5½ cwt. Sweep is not a problem


Raising the Sweeps with ropes and pulleys
Raising the Sweeps with ropes and pulleys


The blocks for the outer track were made to our specification
The blocks for the outer track were made to our specification


This chair bracket takes the drive from the fanblades to the fan carriage wheels
This chair bracket takes the drive from the fanblades to the fan carriage wheels


The completed Fantackle assembly
The completed Fantackle assembly


The stone furniture was constructed and installed by Society volunteers
The stone furniture was constructed and installed by Society volunteers


The fine flour and course flour are collected in the Trow
The fine flour and course flour are collected in the Trow


The Windshaft was moved forward by inserting thin metal plates behind the Tail Bearing
The Windshaft was moved forward by inserting thin metal plates behind the Tail Bearing


The collar at the top of the Centre Post required replacement as the oak timbers had dried out and shrunk over a period of 180 years
The collar at the top of the Centre Post required replacement as the oak timbers had dried out and shrunk over a period of 180 years


The new collar is fitted
The new collar is fitted


The new collar is fitted

Please click here for details on our 2007 work on the Stock and Sweeps.

 

This page features a selection of photographs of our restoration and maintenance of Jill Windmill

Lowering the Sweeps
Lowering the Sweeps


Painting the Sweeps
Painting the Sweeps


The construction of the outer track could only be  carried out on dry, windless Saturdays
The construction of the outer track could only be carried out on dry, windless Saturdays
As a result, this project took 18 months


A specially constructed scaffold platform was erected for the fitting of the fan blades
A specially constructed scaffold platform was erected for the fitting of the fan blades


These millstones are being "dressed" by Society volunteers
These millstones are being "dressed" by Society volunteers


The 17½ cwt. millstones are periodically cleaned
The 17½ cwt. millstones are periodically cleaned with brushes and a vacuum cleaner      A very dusty job !!


The Flour Dresser on the floor above separates the ground meal into fine flour, course flour and bran
The Flour Dresser on the floor above separates the ground meal into fine flour, course flour and bran


The mill was "Head Sick" so we constructed a moveable plate which allows us to correct the horizontal alignment of the 23 ton mill body
The mill was "Head Sick" so we constructed a moveable plate which allows us to correct the horizontal alignment of the 23 ton mill body


With the old collar removed, the timbers are prepared for the new collar
With the old collar removed, the timbers are prepared for the new collar


The new collar is constructed of two segments
The new collar is constructed of two segments

Maintenance work is carried out on most Saturday mornings throughout the year

 

In 2014 our maintenance team discovered rot in one of the Sweeps constructed in 1982.

We decided to build a new Sweep using a Whip constructed from laminated larch :

whilst the rest of the Sweep components were to be made from Pitch Pine.

Following advice from millwrights and people in the timber trade, however, we were persuaded that Siberian Larch was of better quality than the current stocks of new Pitch Pine.

The initial search of sawmills in Sussex had borne no useful results at all and so we had turned our gaze further north. Eventually we tracked down Sykes Timber, hardwood and softwood merchants based in Atherstone, Warwickshire who claimed to have a stock of top-grade slow-grown Siberian Larch and, to that end, a small group of our volunteers were dispatched to Warwickshire to check out their claims.

The team were not disappointed. They were positively overwhelmed by the quantity and quality of much of the larch.

They therefore explained to the timber merchant the reason for the potential purchase, stressing how important it was, if the team (for maintenance work) were to safely climb the sweeps once re erected on the mill, for there to be no significant knot holes or other impairments in the timber. This did not faze the timber merchant at all and he undertook to select the best timber for Jill Mill once an order was received.

The team returned to Sussex, discussed what they had seen, sized up the requirements (including spare timber for future work) and placed the order.

Within the week, the timber was dispatched by lorry to the Mill and work started immediately to cut and machine the large planks into the sections required for the rebuilding of the old sweep that needs replacing.

What is really remarkable is the quality and weight of the timber supplied. Apart from a limited amount of sap wood at the edges of the planks, all of it looks like it will be of sufficient quality to be usable for the job in hand. And the weight of the timber confirms that it really was slow-grow, and thus very close-grained which is just what was needed.

 








The photographs below show views of Jill Windmill before our restoration project commenced and their equivalent views in Spring 2010. It is interesting to note that most features have been retained both internally and externally, the main exceptions being the flooring in the Roundhouse and the new fantackle assembly.

Before Spring 2010
Before Spring 2010
Before Spring 2010
Before Spring 2010
Before Spring 2010
Before Spring 2010
Spring 2010 photos by David Meares